The Great Roller Coaster Wheel Debate
#1
Lagoon staying open past the end of October would be highly weather dependent. Maybe a 1 week run of Frightmares in November would be a hit. Universal does it. I don't know if it's true but I've heard a lot of the rides have trouble operating under a certain temperature. Anyway I'd be happy if they just add the regular last week of Frightmares back on to the schedule.
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#2
(04-04-2020, 11:31 AM)crooks.mark Wrote: I don't know if it's true but I've heard a lot of the rides have trouble operating under a certain temperature. Anyway I'd be happy if they just add the regular last week of Frightmares back on to the schedule.

It’s true. As we all know, when it’s cold, rides tend to run slower, which can lead to valleying. Polyurethane wheels can actually crack if they run under a certain temperature. At that point, they actually have to switch to nylon wheels, which can withstand much lower temperatures, but provide a very rough ride, because they are very stiff when compared to polyurethane wheels. Also, the risk of wheels cracking isn’t completely eliminated when switching to nylon wheels.

Wooden coasters can’t operate in the cold because they could possibly absorb some water, and when wood gets cold, it gets stiff and can literally shatter.
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#3
(04-04-2020, 06:07 PM)DaSpanishPotato Wrote: It’s true. As we all know, when it’s cold, rides tend to run slower, which can lead to valleying. Polyurethane wheels can actually crack if they run under a certain temperature. At that point, they actually have to switch to nylon wheels, which can withstand much lower temperatures, but provide a very rough ride, because they are very stiff when compared to polyurethane wheels. Also, the risk of wheels cracking isn’t completely eliminated when switching to nylon wheels.

Wooden coasters can’t operate in the cold because they could possibly absorb some water, and when wood gets cold, it gets stiff and can literally shatter.
Interesting but I've heard it's more than just the coasters. Anyway I don't think people would be very interested in going if it was too cold anyway.
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#4
(04-04-2020, 06:07 PM)DaSpanishPotato Wrote: It’s true. As we all know, when it’s cold, rides tend to run slower, which can lead to valleying. Polyurethane wheels can actually crack if they run under a certain temperature. At that point, they actually have to switch to nylon wheels, which can withstand much lower temperatures, but provide a very rough ride, because they are very stiff when compared to polyurethane wheels. Also, the risk of wheels cracking isn’t completely eliminated when switching to nylon wheels.

Wooden coasters can’t operate in the cold because they could possibly absorb some water, and when wood gets cold, it gets stiff and can literally shatter.


I would dispute a lot of this!  Rides wont run "slower" because it's cold and will not lead to "Valleying"

Temperature has no effect on how fast a ride may or may not go. They are not built out of water! The only time that I know of any "Valleying" is during extreme wind and possibly not enough weight
As far as the Polyurethane https://gallaghercorp.com/white-papers/e...yurethane/
According to the site:
"One area where molded polyurethane excels is it’s resistance to cold temperatures.
 
Molded polyurethane remains flexible at low temperatures. It possesses outstanding resistance to thermal shock. Many of the polyurethanes used here at Gallagher do not become brittle at temperatures below -80°F (-62°C). But, stiffening gradually increases as the temperature is reduced below 0°F (-18°C). Special compositions can be made which retain some flexibility at temperatures as low as -125°F (-87°C)."

As far as wood goes they are using Pressure treated wood on the Roller Coast which wouldn't absorb water and before that they where painting the wood to keep water out.

The only real ride that I have heard having any issues in conditions of water is the Jet Star 2 and that's because it still has old breaks and the trains are known to go right through the break section at the end.
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#5
(04-04-2020, 08:24 PM)DeLorean Wrote: I would dispute a lot of this!  Rides wont run "slower" because it's cold and will not lead to "Valleying"

Temperature has no effect on how fast a ride may or may not go. They are not built out of water! The only time that I know of any "Valleying" is during extreme wind and possibly not enough weight
As far as the Polyurethane https://gallaghercorp.com/white-papers/e...yurethane/
According to the site:
"One area where molded polyurethane excels is it’s resistance to cold temperatures.
 
Molded polyurethane remains flexible at low temperatures. It possesses outstanding resistance to thermal shock. Many of the polyurethanes used here at Gallagher do not become brittle at temperatures below -80°F (-62°C). But, stiffening gradually increases as the temperature is reduced below 0°F (-18°C). Special compositions can be made which retain some flexibility at temperatures as low as -125°F (-87°C)."

As far as wood goes they are using Pressure treated wood on the Roller Coast which wouldn't absorb water and before that they where painting the wood to keep water out.

The only real ride that I have heard having any issues in conditions of water is the Jet Star 2 and that's because it still has old breaks and the trains are known to go right through the break section at the end.

Rides run slower in the morning because the lubricant in the wheel bearings is less viscous, because the lubricant is cold. While yes, the morning tests do definitely help with warming up the lubricant, it’s often still very cold outside when they are testing.

Polyurethane still becomes less and less flexible the colder it is, and when that happens, with wind chill, the wheels on Cannibal would easily be in the temperature range that would render them inflexible.

No matter how much a piece of wood is treated, at the end of the day, it will still absorb some water, even if that amount of water absorbed is less than 10 milliliters.
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#6
(04-04-2020, 09:52 PM)DaSpanishPotato Wrote: Rides run slower in the morning because the lubricant in the wheel bearings is less viscous, because the lubricant is cold. While yes, the morning tests do definitely help with warming up the lubricant, it’s often still very cold outside when they are testing.

Polyurethane still becomes less and less flexible the colder it is, and when that happens, with wind chill, the wheels on Cannibal would easily be in the temperature range that would render them inflexible.

No matter how much a piece of wood is treated, at the end of the day, it will still absorb some water, even if that amount of water absorbed is less than 10 milliliters.

This is such nonsense its not even worth proving wrong lol. Its not the lubricant.
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#7
(04-04-2020, 10:17 PM)UtahCoasterEnth Wrote: This is such nonsense its not even worth proving wrong lol. Its not the lubricant.


I was just waiting for you or Sid to show up and set things straight lol


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#8
Sorry guys I didn't mean to start the great roller coaster wheel debate. I had just heard that when the temperature gets cold some of the rides have to be kept running (standby mode?) or they were really hard to get back up again. I have zero idea if there is any truth to this at all.
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#9
(04-04-2020, 10:17 PM)UtahCoasterEnth Wrote: This is such nonsense its not even worth proving wrong lol. Its not the lubricant.

Well, to be fair, it does technically have an effect. From my experience, anything requiring compressed air tends to struggle as temperatures get closer to freezing.

Most of all, rides are unbelievably uncomfortable in the freezing cold.
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#10
(04-04-2020, 10:17 PM)UtahCoasterEnth Wrote: This is such nonsense its not even worth proving wrong lol. Its not the lubricant.
I'm with you it's not even worth touching.....
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