Hand Stamps
#1
So I noticed that hand stamping should be removed due to this virus in the Lagoon Facebook page.


This was Lagoon's response

"Lagoon Amusement Park Dave Shreve Thank you for your concern. We have, of course, been discussing this issue as the health and safety of our guests and employees is our number one priority. Please stay tuned!"

I never have understood the hand stamp either....I know that Lagoon does things like the Clogging and other dancing every year (Although I don't think that it's going to happen this year)

Really though if someone is coming in that didn't pay for the ride pass the likely hood they are even going to want to rides is low and I know that a majority of those people that are entering with out having the ride pass purchased are probably so busy doing other things that they wont get time to ride anything.

What is everyone's thoughts on this though?
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#2
The bracelets are better, though the whole stamp/bracelet thing seems silly to me too. But what's the logic behind hand stamps spreading viruses? A Google search said that they're stamping the hands of quarantined people in India to identify them.


*Edit: I realized it's because the stamp touches a lot of other people's hands before it touches yours. If they have to sanitize every lap bar between every ride Skyride is going to have quite the wait time.
Twirling Ribbons 
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#3
I think the main point of the stamp is for nostalgia. I really like it actually, but it does seem kinda unnecessary to check for stamps at the ride entrances.


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#1-Steel Vengeance or Mille

Parks Visited: Lagoon, Cedar Point, Kings Island, Kennywood, Six Flags Magic Mountain, Knott's Berry Farm, and Pacific Park
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#4
I never even thought about that aspect YUCK!!! How many thousands of people a day does that one hand stamp touch? Do they ever even get sanitized? I've thought forever that the hand stamp/ ticket thing is just weird. Unless you were on some kind of group outing I don't know how you would even get into the park without a season pass or buying a day pass. Lagoon is spending a fortune on an antiquated thing from the past just to accommodate a few people. Regardless I've had my last hand stamp. They either do away with it or I'll get the bracelet thing or whatever they do.
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#5
(04-06-2020, 04:25 PM)jetstar2 Wrote: If they have to sanitize every lap bar between every ride Skyride is going to have quite the wait time.

I've been pondering how Lagoon will do some of the cleaning, and I think Sky Ride would be an easy one by just adding a third employee that wipes down the carrier after the guests get off and right before the next ones get on. Lagoon may have to slow the ride down a bit, but I think it is very doable. Happy
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#6
I would not be worried in the least about the hand stamp. You are transferring a coating from the stamp to the recipient. I would be willing to bet that the potential for transference of bacteria or viruses from the recipient to the stamp is virtually zero and the likelihood of growing a viable colony from a hand stamp borders on impossibility.

-Z
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#7
Hey Z-I always greatly appreciate your information. So you're saying the hand stamp or hand stamp pad could not grow bacteria or viruses?
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#8
(04-07-2020, 01:39 PM)crooks.mark Wrote: Hey Z-I always greatly appreciate your information. So you're saying the hand stamp or hand stamp pad could not grow bacteria or viruses?
The stamp probably not. The pad, maybe. However, bacteria need a few things to grow... a carbon source, nutrients, and an energy source. Bacteria that are problematic for people generally require adequate temperatures and a medium to grow in. The ink pad could theoretically provide that medium, but the contents are generally alcohol, glycerine, and dyes. These ingredients don't really lend themselves for growth of bacteria that could cause problems for people.

Viruses are a different matter. They are not technically alive according to classic definitions, consisting of RNA and a cell delivery package. The ability of viruses to survive and propogate depend on how the virus packages itself, which is why HIV is fragile outside of bodily fluids and Covid-19 is relatively resilient. Could Covid-19 survive on an ink pad? Possibly, though it is likely that the alcohol and glycerine in the ink pad would have something to say about that, since it is likely that they will degrade the virus envelope, though it would need to be tested. The RNA of the virus cannot be delivered to the human body if that envelope is not sufficiently intact to a) contain the RNA, and b) interface with the ACE-2 receptors on the human body. Both of these portions of the envelope are likely fragile enough that the stamp pad alone could kill the virus, though I would guard the pads to keep people from breathing on them just in case.

-Z
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#9
(04-07-2020, 03:04 PM)Z Wrote: The stamp probably not. The pad, maybe. However, bacteria need a few things to grow... a carbon source, nutrients, and an energy source. Bacteria that are problematic for people generally require adequate temperatures and a medium to grow in. The ink pad could theoretically provide that medium, but the contents are generally alcohol, glycerine, and dyes. These ingredients don't really lend themselves for growth of bacteria that could cause problems for people.

Viruses are a different matter. They are not technically alive according to classic definitions, consisting of RNA and a cell delivery package. The ability of viruses to survive and propogate depend on how the virus packages itself, which is why HIV is fragile outside of bodily fluids and Covid-19 is relatively resilient. Could Covid-19 survive on an ink pad? Possibly, though it is likely that the alcohol and glycerine in the ink pad would have something to say about that, since it is likely that they will degrade the virus envelope, though it would need to be tested. The RNA of the virus cannot be delivered to the human body if that envelope is not sufficiently intact to a) contain the RNA, and b) interface with the ACE-2 receptors on the human body. Both of these portions of the envelope are likely fragile enough that the stamp pad alone could kill the virus, though I would guard the pads to keep people from breathing on them just in case.

-Z
Thank you for the clarity. I do however stand by that it's time to do away with the whole hand stamp/ticket thing. Again it's got to be costing the park a fortune to accommodate the few people who don't fall into the season pass/day pass category. Maybe they can give those people a head stamp...just kidding!
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#10
(04-07-2020, 03:26 PM)crooks.mark Wrote: Thank you for the clarity. I do however stand by that it's time to do away with the whole hand stamp/ticket thing. Again it's got to be costing the park a fortune to accommodate the few people who don't fall into the season pass/day pass category. Maybe they can give those people a head stamp...just kidding!
I don't think it makes sense to stamp hands anymore either. You have people checking for stamps all day long. How often do people go through without a stamp? They don't even sell gate entry passes anymore. The only way to get in without a pass is on a group entry gate pass. They could simply tell companies that they are going to require them all to have ride passes now. I doubt it will reduce GAT sales very much.

-Z
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